Tag Archives: bone broth

Healthy Recipe: Beef Bone Broth

Last week we discussed the benefits of collagen and why it’s absolutely vital that you include this protein in your daily diet. Because collagen is mainly found in the bones of chicken, beef, and fish, it takes a little creativity to extract the protein so you can consume it. Our favorite way to get at this health-boosting protein is to make bone broth.

bone broth

This recipe uses beef and chicken feet, which are optional, but make the broth more gelatinous; however, you can use beef, chicken, or fish bones, or any combination of the three. The key is to let the broth simmer for an extended length of time, at least 24 hours if you’re using beef bones. This allows all of the marrow and collagen to come out of the bones and into the broth.

What You Need:

  • 3 lbs beef marrow bones
  • 2 chicken feet (optional)
  • 3 carrots, chopped
  • 3 stalks celery, chopped
  • 1 large yellow onion, chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, smashed
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 3 tablespoons raw apple cider vinegar
  • Enough water to cover

What To Do:

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F and spread beef bones out on a baking sheet. Once oven is preheated, roast bones for 30 minutes.
  2. Put carrots, celery, onion, garlic, salt, peppercorns, and bay leaves on the bottom of a slow cooker and place the roasted bones and chicken feet on top.
  3. Pour apple cider vinegar over the bones and chicken feet and then fill up the slower cooker with just enough water to completely cover the bones.
  4. Turn the slow cooker on low and let simmer for 24-48 hours.
  5. After 24-48 hours, allow to cool and then strain out the solids. Reserve liquid in a separate container and allow to cool.
  6. Store finished bone broth in the refrigerator for up to a week or in the freezer for up to 3 months.

Collagen: America’s Next Superfood?

Nutrition is a science; but it’s a dynamic science. Things are constantly changing as experts learn about new foods, or about how old foods affect the body in ways that we may not have previously known about. As a result of this constantly changing nature of nutrition, it may seem like the spotlight is always pointed on a new “superfood”, and really, it is; but that’s a good thing. It gives us the power to choose foods that support our body and our health and that’s the most important thing you can do. Recently, the spotlight has been on collagen and we’ve been getting a lot of questions on it: What is it? What are the health benefits? How can I incorporate it into my diet?

Like always, we’ve got your back. This week, we’ve broken down the science for you to let you know exactly what collagen is and how it can help you. Next week, we’ll share our favorite way for you to incorporate this “superfood” into your diet.

collagen

What is Collagen?

Collagen is the most abundant protein in your body, accounting for almost one-third of your body’s protein. It’s one of the major components in your skin, muscles, tendons, ligaments, GI tract, and bones. Collagen is also part of your teeth, blood vessels, and eyes. The simple way to think of collagen is as the glue that holds everything together. It gives everything structure.

As you age, your body starts to produce less (and lower quality) collagen. This is the reason that you can see the skin start to age. In addition to advancing age, collagen can also be damaged by excessive sun exposure, smoking, and a diet that’s high in sugar and refined carbohydrates (like white bread and pasta).

Benefits of Collagen

It’s true that your body makes collagen, but because of the wide range of benefits, you can (and should) also get the protein from your diet and from supplements, if necessary.

Consumption of collagen can:

  • Improve skin elasticity
  • Reduce joint pain and degeneration
  • Improve gut health
  • Boost metabolism
  • Increase muscle mass
  • Strengthen hair, nails, and teeth
  • Protect heart health
  • Improve liver function

Sources of Collagen

Collagen comes from four major places: beef, chicken, fish, and eggs. The catch is that most of the collagen found in beef, chicken, and fish is found in their bones, so you have to get creative to figure out how to extract it and get it into your body. Our favorite way to do this is to make a bone broth that we can sip on at any time of the day.

Collagen is also available in supplement form. It’s usually a powder that you can mix into any liquid. Because of the way it’s processed, most collagen supplements are odorless and tasteless and can easily mix into even cold water.