Category Archives: General Health

Five Fall Spices That Boost Your Health

People always talk about the change in weather when fall rolls around; but have you ever noticed that fall seems to have it’s own flavor? As summer comes to an end, citrus and watermelon move aside for cinnamon, spice, and everything nice. Notes of cinnamon, ginger, and cloves begin to pop up everywhere. While all each one of these typical fall spices gets your taste buds jumping for joy, their benefits go way beyond flavor. Spices contain powerful compounds that improve your physical health.

Fall spices ginger

Cinnamon

Inflammation gets a bad rap, but it’s actually an important physiological response that helps protect your body from infection and helps fight tissue damage. It’s only when inflammation becomes chronic, which can happen from a bad diet, lots of stress, or leaky gut (to name a few), that it becomes a problem.

Cinnamon is packed with powerful antioxidants that fight inflammation and lower the risk of diseases related to inflammation, like heart disease and inflammatory bowel disease. The antioxidants in cinnamon also protect the body from free radicals—unstable compounds that cause physical damage to your DNA that can lead to cancer, heart disease, and diabetes. Cinnamon may also improve blood sugar and cholesterol levels in people with type 2 diabetes.

A specific compound in cinnamon, called CEppt, contains properties that can halt the progression of Alzheimer’s disease and the growth of the plaques on the brain connected to it.

Nutmeg

Like cinnamon, nutmeg has antioxidant properties that fight inflammation and damage from free radicals. Nutmeg goes a step further by helping ease digestive symptoms like gas, nausea, and diarrhea.  It also contains a natural compound called myristicin that can protect your brain from Alzheimer’s and dementia.

According to tradition, the reason our bodies crave nutmeg as the weather starts to cool down is  because it helps warm up and can fight off colds and stomachaches, which are more common in the fall and winter.

Clove

Cloves are anti-fungal, antiseptic, antibacterial, and antiseptic and loaded with antioxidants. They’re also a good source of manganese, a mineral that helps metabolize carbohydrates and fats, regulates blood sugar, and keeps blood clotting normally.

According to Ayurvedic medicine, cloves help relieve sore throats and act as an expectorant, or a compound that helps you cough up excess phlegm and mucus.

Ginger

One of the most well-known effects of ginger is its ability to relieve nausea. It’s often used for seasickness, morning sickness during pregnancy, and even nausea following chemotherapy. In addition to soothing an upset stomach, ginger may help alleviate chronic indigestion.

Ginger is also a powerful pain reliever and blood regulator. In one study, ginger dramatically lowered both fasting blood sugar and A1c levels in people with type 2 diabetes.

Ginger may also help prevent cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, and oral inflammatory diseases, like gingivitis and periodontitis.

Cardamom

Although it’s not as well-known as the previous four spices, cardamom has been used in both cooking and medicine for centuries. Cardamom is rich in antioxidants that protect against heart disease and cancer and it can lower blood pressure.

The sweet spice also has antimicrobial properties, so it can boost your immune system and help fight off unwanted bacteria and fungi, a property that is ideal during the cooler fall and winter months.

Probiotics Versus Prebiotics

Last week we discussed the role certain bacteria in the gut play in helping you lose weight where we briefly touched upon the subject of prebiotics. Many of you asked us to clarify what prebiotics are and explain the difference between prebiotics and probiotics, which are more widely known.

prebiotics yogurt

What are Probiotics?

Probiotics are live bacteria. They are found in certain foods and drinks, like yogurt, sauerkraut, kefir, kombucha, and miso. There are also a wide variety of probiotic supplements available on the market in both powder and capsule form.

The term probiotics is used to describe any living bacteria that is beneficial to its host: you. In studies, probiotics have been shown to boost the immune system, prevent infection, improve digestive function, and boost mood.

Because probiotics are living organisms, they can be very unstable. They are sensitive to both heat and light, and generally must be kept in a cool, dark, dry place — the refrigerator is usually best.

What are Prebiotics?

Unlike probiotics, prebiotics are not live organisms. Prebiotics is the term used to describe a specialized type of plant fiber that feeds probiotics. Basically, the probiotics (or live bacteria) feed on prebiotics in order to grow and multiply. The body itself can’t digest these plant fibers, so they’re left to promote the growth of good bacteria in your gut. Like probiotics, prebiotics come in food sources, like onions, garlics, leeks, and kefir, and as over-the-counter supplements.

Synbiotic Regimen

When you take both probiotics and prebiotics together — or consume both probiotic and prebiotic foods — it’s called a synbiotic regimen. The best way to ensure that the bacteria in your gut are flourishing — or that the probiotic you’re taking is working — is to take probiotics and prebiotics together.

Some foods, like cheese, kefir, and certain types of yogurt, are called synbiotic foods because they contain both probiotics and prebiotics. You can also purchase synbiotic supplements.

The Secret to Weight Loss May Be in the Gut

For years, health professionals claimed that the only thing you have to focus on when it comes to weight loss is calories. If the calories you eat total less than the calories you burn through regular daily living and exercise, then you would lose the weight. Simple, right? Not so fast. More recent research shows that it’s not that simple. Many people on restricted calorie diets and exercising regularly did not see results, which led to frustration and abandonment of a weight loss regimen altogether. So what gives?

While calories do play a role in weight loss — if you overeat, you won’t lose weight — they’re not the end all, be all. Other things, like genetics, metabolism, and types of food you eat, matter too. But researchers were not satisfied with this either, so they dug a little deeper, which led them into the gut.

Bacteria in the Gut

By now, you’ve probably heard about how the gut plays a role in your health. In fact, Hippocrates, often referred to as the Father of Medicine, went so far as to say that all disease begins in the gut. But your gut doesn’t just play a role in disease, or the absence of it, it also plays a role in how easily it is for you to lose weight.

According to a study published in the International Journal of Obesity, your ability to lose weight depends heavily on the amount of two types of bacteria — bacteroides and prevotella — in your gut. These two types of bacteria help digest the fiber in your diet and, based on research, people with higher concentrations of them in their gut tend to lose weight faster and more easily.

How Do you Measure Bacteria?

The bad news here is that the only way to know if you’re one of the people who has high concentrations of bacteroides and prevotella in your gut is to collect a sample of your stool and ship it off to the lab. But here’s the good news: you don’t really need to know because either way, you can do the things necessary to boost the number of these bacteria and improve your gut health and meet your weight loss goals.

Boosting Bacteroides and Prevotella

You can’t find bacteroides and prevotella in a probiotic supplement because they only have the ability to live outside of the human body for a short period of time. But what you can do is give these bacteria the nourishment they need to grow and multiply so that they take up residence in your gut in higher numbers. The way to do this is by consuming pre-biotics, which are plant-based fibers that feed them. Foods like chicory root, dandelion greens, garlic, onions, leeks, asparagus, bananas, barley, oats, apples, flaxseeds, wheat bran, and jicama contain prebiotic fibers.

Of course, even though you can’t directly increase bacteroides and prevotella through supplementation with probiotics, it’s not a bad idea to take them since they help balance the rest of the gut microbiome.

The Types of Body Fat — and Why They Matter

When you think about fat, you might not think about the types as much as you think “I just want it gone!”; but recognizing the different types of body fat is important in determining your risk of developing certain health problems. While some fat is nothing more than a cosmetic issue, other types of fat can increase your risk of developing diabetes, heart disease, and even dementia.

belly fat

Brown Fat

Brown fat, also called Brown Adipose Tissue or BAT, is found mostly in the back of the neck. This type of fat is beneficial and helps convert the calories from the food you eat into heat to keep your core temperature warm.

Brown fat acts like a muscle when triggered by a dip in body temperature. When it’s cold outside, or when you’re standing in a cold shower or swimming in a cold ocean, your brown fat starts to burn calories for energy to heat the body. On average, a normal weight adult stores 2 to 3 ounces of brown fat, which burns about 250 calories over the course of 3 hours.

White Fat

Your body holds significantly more white fat than brown fat. Unlike brown fat, which burns energy, white fat stores energy, but that’s only one of its jobs. White fat also plays a role in hormone production and the control of insulin. Having too much white fat can make the body less sensitive to insulin, and as a result, can lead to insulin resistance and, eventually, diabetes. White fat is categorized even further into two types: subcutaneous and visceral.

Subcutaneous Fat

Almost 80 percent of fat is subcutaneous fat. This is the type of fat that lies just below the skin’s surface. It’s the fat that’s measured when determining body fat percentage; and it’s also the fat that’s typically responsible for the appearance of cellulite (although cellulite is much more complicated than this and a story for a different day).

Subcutaneous fat exists all over the body, but it’s most common in the thighs, hips, and belly. Unlike brown fat, which burns energy, subcutaneous fat stores energy. That’s why, if you regularly eat too many calories, these fatty areas will continue to grow.

Visceral Fat

Visceral fat is the deep fat that wraps around the inner organs and can cause serious health problems. Having a lot of visceral fat increases your risk of diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and dementia. Typically, visceral fat is found in the stomach area. A big waist and/or belly is a good indication that you have a lot of visceral fat.

Women with a waist circumference of more than 35 inches and men with a waist circumference of more than 40 inches are the biggest risk of developing serious diseases.

 

The Basics of Intermittent Fasting

A couple of weeks ago, we discussed HIIT, a type of workout that has been quite the trending topic on social media lately. This week, we wanted to stay with the theme of trending topics and decided to give you the lowdown on the dieting movement that’s also been making its rounds: intermittent fasting. We know it sounds complicated and a little bit intimidating, but when you break it down, it’s actually quite straightforward.

intermittent fasting

What is Intermittent Fasting?

Put simply, intermittent fasting is a term for an eating strategy that alternates between set periods of fasting and eating. There are no guidelines as to what you eat, just when you eat; but even those guidelines are loose, as it’s typically up to you to determine your fasting and eating windows. There are different types of intermittent fasting, but these are two of the most popular patterns:

  • The Leangains Method (also called the 16/8 Method): When following a Leangains intermittent fasting protocol, you fast for 16 hours and eat during an 8 hour window. This means that you pick a time, typically in the afternoon, when you will consume all of your calories for the day. Outside of that time, you eat nothing for the rest of the day. For example, you may eat between 12 pm and 8 pm and then fast for the other 16 hours.
  • Eat-Stop-Eat: The Eat-Stop-Eat method involves fasting for 24 hours once or twice per week; then eating normally for the rest of the week. For the fasting day, you would typically eat dinner and then fast until dinner the next day.

Benefits of Intermittent Fasting

Most people venture into intermittent fasting for its weight loss benefits, but the eating method has several benefits that reach beyond weight loss.

  • Hormone balance: When you fast, your body adjusts levels of several different hormones to make it easier for your body to use fat as energy. Your levels of human growth hormone (or HGH), which is associated with fat loss and muscle gain, increases as much as five times; while insulin levels drop significantly, helping to lower body fat.
  • Reduced inflammation: In some studies, intermittent fasting has been shown to reduce chronic inflammation, which is associated with many health issues, including asthma, arthritis, cancer, heart disease, high blood pressure, and Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Heart health: Intermittent fasting may reduce several risk factors for heart disease, including LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, blood sugar, and insulin levels.
  • Brain health: Some studies have shown that intermittent fasting may increase levels of a hormone in the brain called brain-derived neurotrophic factor, or BDNF. Higher levels of BDNF are linked to better long-term memory.

Although the scientific studies on intermittent fasting are fairly recent, the research is promising. We think the trend is definitely worth looking into.

What do you think? Have you tried intermittent fasting? Tell us your thoughts!

*If you have a medical condition, please consult your doctor before trying intermittent fasting. Contraindications include diabetes, blood sugar imbalances, low blood pressure, medications, and pregnancy/breastfeeding. If you are a woman who is trying to conceive, intermittent fasting may not be right for you.

watermelon

Watermelon: Five Reasons to Eat the Summer Fruit

Watermelon has become an unofficial mascot of summer. It’s almost impossible to go to a picnic or a barbecue without seeing the juicy red fruit as part of the spread. You might choose watermelon because it tastes refreshing and delicious, but did you know that the melon also provides some remarkable health benefits?

watermelon

1. It’s hydrating.

We know that drinking water prevents dehydration, which is especially important during these summer months; but did you know that eating foods with a high water content can also help keep you hydrated? Not only that, foods with a higher water content help keep you full.

Although there is a slight variation, most sources agree that watermelon is somewhere between 90 and 92 percent water, making it one of the most water-packed foods you can eat.

2. It’s low in calories, but packed with nutrients.

Because of its high water content, watermelon is low in calories, but don’t let that fool you. The summer fruit is a powerhouse of nutrients. A cup of cubed watermelon contains:

  • 17 percent of your daily vitamin A
  • 21 percent of your daily vitamin C
  • 5 percent of your daily potassium
  • 4 percent of your daily magnesium
  • 3 percent of your daily vitamins B1, B5, and B6

and the antioxidants lycopene and cucurbitacin E, which help fight inflammation and chronic disease.

3. Watermelon might combat cancer.

Watermelon is one of the richest source of lycopene, a phytochemical that’s responsible for the fruit’s red color. Studies have shown that lycopene may help prevent and treat prostate cancer, although no official conclusions have been reached. In addition to combating cancer, lycopene can help improve heart health and bone health. One cup of watermelon contains 7 to 10 milligrams of lycopene. Other sources of lycopene include tomato, red grapefruit, and guava.

4. It can improve heart health.

Watermelon contains an amino acid called citrulline, which converts to another amino acid — arginine — in the body. Both of these amino acids can help improve circulation and blood flow, two factors that are important for the health of your heart. A study done in 2012 found that taking watermelon extract supplements may even help reduce high blood pressure.

5. It may reduce muscle soreness.

In addition to helping your heart, the improved circulation and blood flow from the amino acids citrulline and arginine may also help soothe muscle soreness. In a study published in the Journal of Agricultural Food and Chemistry, researchers reported that athletes who drank watermelon juice before a hard workout experienced a lower heart rate and reduced muscle soreness the next day.

And aside from these health benefits, simply put, watermelon tastes great! What is your favorite thing about watermelon? Are you a fan of the summer treat?

Childhood Obesity: Is Technology to Blame?

The World Health Organization declared childhood obesity as one of the most serious public health challenges of the 21st century. Since the 1970s, childhood obesity rates have tripled in the US, and now, 1 in every 6 American children is obese. But in addition to the estimated 12.5 million children that are obese, there are also about 11 million more who are overweight.

child tv

Childhood obesity is not just a physical health concern, it can negatively affect a child’s emotional and social development too. And the record shows that obese children are more likely to become obese adults, which sets them up for the development of chronic health problems like heart disease and diabetes at a much younger age.

Cause of Childhood Obesity

So what’s to blame? There isn’t a simple answer to that; but experts agree that it’s a combination of a diet filled with processed and fast foods and lack of physical exercise due to an increase in “screen time” — or the amount of time spent with technology. Because increasing technology use is such a big thing right now, we’re going to focus on that. That’s not to say that it’s the only culprit, but we want to give you a little perspective on why technology may not be as harmless as you think.

Technology Usage Soars

The American Academy of Pediatrics estimates that the average child spends around seven hours each day watching TV, browsing the internet, and playing video games. An obvious issue with this is that as the amount of screen time increases, the amount of time spent outside running around and burning off calories — and energy — decreases; however, there are other not-so-obvious issues too.

Food Marketing

In a 2008 study, the Journal of the American Dietetic Association reported that nine out of 10 food advertisements shown during Saturday morning children’s cartoons are foods that are low in nutrients, yet high in fat, sodium, and sugar. Even though you may not realize it, this food marketing has a major impact on the foods your child wants to eat. Children are said to be even more susceptible to this food marketing because, unlike adults, they have a hard time telling the difference between the TV show they’re watching and the advertisements.

Technology Increases Snacking

Screen time is also associated with an increase in snacking or mindless eating. According to research from the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, kids who spent more time in front of a screen — regardless of whether it was a computer, TV, or video game — not only snacked more than children who spent less time using technology, but they also ate fewer healthy snacks. Other research shows that the more stimulating programs, like action games or high-paced cartoons, can also lead to an increase in snacking during the day.

Technology Interferes With Sleep

Technology can also disrupt sleep, which can translate to weight gain. On one hand, focusing on a screen right before bed can disrupt circadian rhythms and melatonin, which can lead to difficulty falling asleep and cause restless sleep. On the other hand, if a child has a television in his or her bedroom and usage is not being monitored, it may lead to later bedtimes, and a decreased amount of the restorative sleep needed for the body to function properly. As we discussed in a previous article, a lack of adequate sleep can cause an increase in ghrelin, the hormone that tells you you’re hungry, and a decrease in leptin, the hormone that tells you you’re full. On average, a person who doesn’t get enough sleep eats an extra 300 calories per day and snacks more often than someone who is well-rested.

Technology Recommendations

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children and adolescents spend only one to two hours per day in front of a screen, at most. This means time spent watching TV and playing on the computer or a tablet combined.

You can help limit screen time by getting involved in playtime with your kids. Pick an activity that you both enjoy and get outside and work up a sweat together. Encourage your kids to get off the couch by playing with them. Model good behavior by putting away your cell phone or tablet and getting fully engaged in the moment.

Weight Loss Program

If you have a child who is overweight or obese, we can help. Valley Medical Weight Control’s program for adolescents includes 4 weeks of FDA-approved medication for children aged 12 and older, a bottle of our Mega Multivitamin and Minerals, a bottle of probiotics, a physician consultation, and weekly weigh-ins: all for just $120!

To learn more, stop by or call us at any of our locations:

North Phoenix: 602-374-3374
Phoenix: 602-441-3305
Tempe: 480-968-5673

Collagen: America’s Next Superfood?

Nutrition is a science; but it’s a dynamic science. Things are constantly changing as experts learn about new foods, or about how old foods affect the body in ways that we may not have previously known about. As a result of this constantly changing nature of nutrition, it may seem like the spotlight is always pointed on a new “superfood”, and really, it is; but that’s a good thing. It gives us the power to choose foods that support our body and our health and that’s the most important thing you can do. Recently, the spotlight has been on collagen and we’ve been getting a lot of questions on it: What is it? What are the health benefits? How can I incorporate it into my diet?

Like always, we’ve got your back. This week, we’ve broken down the science for you to let you know exactly what collagen is and how it can help you. Next week, we’ll share our favorite way for you to incorporate this “superfood” into your diet.

collagen

What is Collagen?

Collagen is the most abundant protein in your body, accounting for almost one-third of your body’s protein. It’s one of the major components in your skin, muscles, tendons, ligaments, GI tract, and bones. Collagen is also part of your teeth, blood vessels, and eyes. The simple way to think of collagen is as the glue that holds everything together. It gives everything structure.

As you age, your body starts to produce less (and lower quality) collagen. This is the reason that you can see the skin start to age. In addition to advancing age, collagen can also be damaged by excessive sun exposure, smoking, and a diet that’s high in sugar and refined carbohydrates (like white bread and pasta).

Benefits of Collagen

It’s true that your body makes collagen, but because of the wide range of benefits, you can (and should) also get the protein from your diet and from supplements, if necessary.

Consumption of collagen can:

  • Improve skin elasticity
  • Reduce joint pain and degeneration
  • Improve gut health
  • Boost metabolism
  • Increase muscle mass
  • Strengthen hair, nails, and teeth
  • Protect heart health
  • Improve liver function

Sources of Collagen

Collagen comes from four major places: beef, chicken, fish, and eggs. The catch is that most of the collagen found in beef, chicken, and fish is found in their bones, so you have to get creative to figure out how to extract it and get it into your body. Our favorite way to do this is to make a bone broth that we can sip on at any time of the day.

Collagen is also available in supplement form. It’s usually a powder that you can mix into any liquid. Because of the way it’s processed, most collagen supplements are odorless and tasteless and can easily mix into even cold water.

Always Up at 3 AM? Your Blood Sugar May be to Blame

We talk about sleep a lot, but that’s because its importance cannot be overstated. Not just for weight loss, but for your health in general. Sleep is nourishing and restorative and when you don’t get enough of it, it can completely throw you off in all areas.

As we started educating our clients on the importance of sleep, we noticed an alarming trend: a large percentage of people admitted that not only do they not get enough sleep, but their sleep is unsatisfying. They toss and turn all night or wake up throughout the night. In addition to that, there was a striking similarity in those who were having sleep trouble. A significant amount of people who admitted to unsatisfying sleep were waking up around 3 AM. We figured that there had to be significance to this time frame, so we dug a little further. We were shocked at what we found.

Why You Wake Up at 3 AM

Your body is a complex organism. Although you probably don’t think about it much, it’s constantly pumping out hormones and balancing these hormones to keep you running like a well-oiled machine. If these hormones are off-kilter, it can cause a number of symptoms – one of which is waking up in the middle of the night. One of the most common causes of waking up around 3 AM is blood sugar imbalance due to stress. Let us break it down for you.

When you’re stressed, it triggers your adrenal glands (which sit right near your kidneys) to pump out a hormone called adrenaline. In response to adrenaline, the liver releases, and your cells use up more, glycogen, the stored form of glucose, or blood sugar. If there is not enough glycogen in your body to replenish the stores in your liver, even more adrenaline is released. As a result, your blood sugar levels drop and you begin to feel alert and ready for action, instead of relaxed and ready for sleep.

So What Do You Do?

Now that you know WHY you’re waking up at 3 AM consistently, the next question is: how do I fix it? The two major goals here are to 1. get your blood sugar balanced and 2. reduce your stress levels.

How to Balance Blood Sugar:
  • Eat 3 meals and 2 to 3 snacks per day. Make sure that all meals and snacks include protein, healthy fat, and healthy carbohydrates.
  • Eliminate processed foods and focus only on whole, nutrient-dense foods.
  • Never skip meals.
  • Avoid sugar.
  • Eat breakfast within an hour of waking up.

While you’re working to balance your blood sugar, here’s a helpful tip that can get you on your way to better sleep right away. Before bed each night, eat a teaspoon of raw, local honey. The honey gives your body the glucose it needs to replenish the liver’s glycogen stores. That way, your adrenals won’t cause your blood sugar to drop during the night.

How to Reduce Stress on the Adrenal Glands:
  • Follow a healthy diet.
  • Go to bed before 10 PM and aim for at least 7 hours of sleep.
  • Avoid coffee and other caffeinated beverages.
  • Engage in yoga and meditation, but avoid intense exercise.
  • Get some sunlight. If this is impossible due to weather, supplement with Vitamin D.
  • Make time to play or engage in activities that you enjoy.

An Important Note

Of course stress and blood sugar imbalance is not the only cause of restless sleep. Sometimes the tossing and turning are a result of sleep apnea, consumption of alcohol, age, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It’s always best to check in with your doctor if you’re having chronic sleep troubles.

Magnesium: a Mineral that Could Change Your Life

When you hear the word “magnesium”, what comes to your mind? You may know that it’s a mineral and one that you’re supposed to be eating, but do you know how incredibly important this one nutrient is for good health? If you don’t, don’t feel bad. You’re not alone. A lot of people focus on carbohydrates, protein, fat, and calories for good health, but there are lots of other vital players, like magnesium, in the game.

magnesium rich walnuts

What Does Magnesium Do?

Every single organ in your body, but especially your heart, lungs, and muscles, relies on magnesium to work properly. The mineral is involved in other 300 different biochemical reactions that range from converting the food you eat into energy to creating new proteins to making your nervous system work. Magnesium does so much for you and yet, according to research, more than half (68% to be exact) of Americans don’t get the recommended minimum daily requirement. To add insult to injury, around 19% of Americans don’t even consume half the recommended amount. So why is this such a problem?

Risks of Deficiency

As we mentioned earlier, having enough magnesium in your body is essential for allowing your organs to function properly. According to research, adults who don’t get enough are more likely to have heart attacks, strokes, and high blood pressure. Low levels of magnesium have also been linked to type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, depression, migraines, asthma, and colon cancer.

Signs of a deficiency can be widespread and non-specific, but the most common include:

  • Anxiety
  • Agitation/irritability
  • Low blood pressure
  • Confusion
  • Insomnia/sleep disorders
  • Hyperventilation
  • Nausea/vomiting
  • Restless leg syndrome
  • Muscle weakness
  • Abnormal heart rhythms

I know this all seems like bad news, but here’s the good part: you can get all the magnesium you need by including magnesium-rich foods in your diet every day. The other good news: one of the magnesium-rich foods is dark chocolate.

Magnesium-Rich Foods

The best way to get enough magnesium in your diet is to make sure that you’re eating a variety of different magnesium-rich foods every day. By varying your food choices, you’re not only making sure your magnesium needs are met, you’re also making sure that you’re getting enough of all the another important vitamins and minerals that you need. The current recommendation is 310-320 milligrams for adult females and 400-420 milligrams for adult males per day.

The following foods are especially rich in magnesium:

  • Pumpkin seeds
  • Walnuts
  • Spinach, boiled
  • Swiss chard
  • Dark chocolate (70–85% cocoa)
  • Black beans
  • Quinoa
  • Halibut
  • Almonds
  • Cashews
  • Mackerel
  • Blackstrap molasses
  • Avocado
  • Salmon

Magnesium Supplementation

Although it’s always best to try to get all the nutrients you need from food, that can be difficult in today’s world. Fortunately, there are many supplements available over the counter. Magnesium supplements come in several different forms, but the forms your body can absorb most effectively are citrate, gluconate, and lactate. Magnesium supplements are generally safe, but always make sure to discuss any new supplements with your doctor before taking them.